Photos of Walter Reed 3 years after it closed

Over Veteran’s Day I got a chance to visit the old Walter Reed…. The week we closed, I really wanted to walk around to all my favorite places and see them one last time, but we were so busy I didn’t get a chance to.  I was thankful to see it again three years later.  How spooky it was to be there without anyone around.  The power was out in all of the buildings, except the Chapel.  So the photos are dark…(and I’m not a photographer).

Building 11 - this was once the dormitory for the Army's first Nursing School.

Building 11, Delano Hall, this was once the dormitory for the Army’s first Nursing School which graduated 400 Army nurses in its first graduating class. The years I was at Walter Reed, it was an administrative building known for anxiety provoking events like: finger printing, security clearances, CAC cards and replacement ID’s. (I had to go there a lot).

one of many old ballrooms.  This one in building 11.

one of many old ballrooms. This one in Building 11.

view from the barracks

view from the barracks

Building Two, Heaton Pavilion (named after Eisenhower's surgeon).  The last active hospital.

Building Two, Heaton Pavilion (named after Eisenhower’s surgeon). The last active hospital.

the veranda in front of Building 2.  No one's running on it anymore.

the veranda in front of Building 2. It is exactly 1/4 mile around, but no one’s running on it anymore.

Hallway into MATC - outside of OT Clinic.  It is dark because the power is out.

Hallway into MATC – outside of OT Clinic. It is dark because the power is out.

No more tour groups (except me!)

Inside the Fishbowl

Fishbowl

No more tour groups (except me)

That's the the "Solo-Step" track in the ceiling, where we could clip patients in so they wouldn't fall when learning to walk/run

That’s the the “Solo-Step” track in the ceiling, where we could clip patients in so they wouldn’t fall when learning to walk/run

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you can just barely make out the tape outline of our old agility ladder on the floor

you can just barely make out the tape outline of our old agility ladder on the floor

This is the view through the one way mirror in the psychiatrist's office looking out into our clinic.  Don't act crazy!

This is the view through the one way mirror in the psychiatrist’s office looking out into our clinic. Don’t act crazy!

someone appears to have left the driving simulator behind.

someone appears to have left the driving simulator behind.

and the 3-D virtual reality treadmill!

and the 3-D virtual reality treadmill!

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– Hallway from MATC to Building One

Walking into the hospital now... This is the prosthetics lab where they assembled the arms and legs.  Empty now.

Walking into the hospital now… This is the prosthetics lab where they assembled the arms and legs. Always busy -empty now.

No more sick call!

No more sick call!

The therapy pool. Where the pool therapist once caught a patient giving her St. Bernard a bath in the locker room.

The therapy pool. Where the pool therapist once found a patient giving a St. Bernard dog a bath in the locker room during lunch.

Inside the 3rd Floor Outpatient PT Clinic - did someone have a party here?

Inside the 3rd Floor Outpatient PT Clinic – did someone have a party here?

3rd Floor Outpatient PT

3rd Floor Outpatient PT

 

View from PT Clinic

View from PT Clinic

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Stairwell in Walter Reed’s colors!

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– Courtyards

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The monkeys were still in the trees

The monkeys were still in the trees

Ward 57, the orthopedics ward.  If you were in a blast injury you were here or Ward 58.

Ward 57 empty at last

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Patient room in the Eisenhower Suite

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– View from the Eisenhower Suite

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– “I see France!” (KD)

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Mologne House gazebo and patio.  Unfortunately the fish in the coy pond were eaten by raccoons after the closure.

Mologne House gazebo and patio. Unfortunately the fish in the coy pond were eaten by raccoons after the closure.

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Crab apple trees.

Crab apple trees.

Nope

Nope

Never noticed these before

Never noticed these before

Old Chapel still looks brilliant!

Old Chapel still looks brilliant!

Working pipe organ

Working pipe organ

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Rumbaugh Garage where I always hoped for parking

Rumbaugh Garage where I had always hoped to qualify for parking

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– Now I’m a tourist. Goodbye WRAMC!  You served us well.

 

 

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103 thoughts on “Photos of Walter Reed 3 years after it closed”

  1. David Peruski said:

    I served in the ANC from 1985-1989 and was at WRAMC the entire time. I was on Ward 52 (neurology) and then worked on Ward 46 (Cardio-Thoracic ICU). WRAMC was a wonderful facility. General Mologne was the commanding officer at the time. He died unexpectedly and then General Clara Adams-Ender became the commanding officer. There were so many great things that happened at WRAMC that have impacted how we care for people even today. So many wonderful military and civilian workers that provided a very high standard of care for our military and their dependents.

  2. Joe Sparacino said:

    I too served as an MP with the 236 Detachment, from 1976 – 1977.
    Saw the new hospital being built, – so strange to see it abandoned now.
    Thanks for the memories!

    ~ Joe Sparacino

    • I was stationed there for my entire tour of duty, 236th MP Det. 77-80, plenty of memories, such a waste to see it just sit there going to waste.

      Steve Trefry

  3. This was our first assignment back in 1988-89. My husband who enlisted as a 91S is retiring in the next few months as a LTC. after nearly 30 yrs of service. He worked at the old WRAIR and our first daughter was born at WRAMC in July 1989. It’s almost hard to look at the pictures of this place so empty and quiet. The historical place where Walter Reed himself worked and discovered medical breakthroughs. So many of our nations Presidents have been there. Just so much history sitting empty. It’s sad that it’s not being used. The Bethesda /Walter Reed just doesn’t feel right to us or have the same feel and historical significance. Thanks for sharing these photos.

  4. I was hospitalized here from 1988-1989 after I broke my L2 on duty. So many friends made there. Not to mention all the staff who made sure that I walked again and had as normal a life as possible. Dr. Cruise, Dr. beaushane, and (nurse) Sgt. Anna Lutz. Too many people to thank to place here. But it is sad to see a place that brought so many heros through the unfathomable sit so quit and desolate. Thanks for sharing!! Too many memories made there for so many people to be ever be forgotten if it is to be gone.

  5. I came here as an MP with a broken/paralyzed right Arm to be chaptered out, and by the Grace of God after 6 months, I regained use from a “severed” radial nerve. I stayed here and worked with the MPI/Detective Unit until I separated. I got out went to work with the Federal Government and came back as a Detective as soon as they made my position a “civilian” slot. GREAT memories here, did protective details for President Reagan and Bush Sr., the Prince of Saudi Arabia Bandar, all our Generals, the Presidents wives and most importantly met so many fine soldiers coming back from war with stories that I respected! WRAMC changed my life forever, and I saw things that I can never “unsee” as a law enforcement officer….that all LEO’s do, but started my career as a civilian federal LEO….

  6. What a heart-filling collection of pictures and memories. I was a civilian with the dept of psychiatry,first at Forest Glen from 1978 to 80 and then in the new hospital from 1980 to 1984, and then with the Dept. of Pediatrics from 1984 to 88. I remember the change in relationships between staff and patients after the move from Forest Glen; suddenly there were guards at the doorways to the wards. On the other hand, patients coming in in the throes of a psychotic episode weren’t waking up to statues of Aphrodite on the porch! I was assistant chief of the art therapy section, working with Paula Howie, while Col. Jon Shaw was Chief of Psychiatry; then Col Chico Harden hired me as director of the child life section, and Col. Peter Zawadsky followed him on Pediatrics. Those years were so rich with wonderful people, hard work, great and difficult experiences. I have endless respect for the military delivery of medical care: you can come in a total train wreck and everything will be attended to. It is hard to understand how a “new” building can be crumbling apart now. And I too wish I had wandered about more – who knew there was a chapel or ballrooms! The memories will shine on; thanks for sharing these pictures.

  7. I stumbled on your blog (now I may have to check out your book) while searching for pictures of old WRAMC to show my children. Army Nurse Corps 2006-2010 MICU. I have a hard to articulating my experiences there and how much those memories mean to me. I don’t think it is possible to ever work with such outstanding patients or co-workers again.

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